mathlovergrowsup

Closing the Teach For America Blogging Gap

I’m watching videos of teachers to identify traits of good and bad teaching so that I can develop observation rubrics. Here is the Algebra Lesson from the Teaching Channel. There are obviously some things this teacher is doing very well. The classroom culture is excellent. Her willingness to keep trying new things and reflect upon…

read more »

First, I’m absolutely loving the people who are commenting. Even when we disagree, the conversations are so useful in moving my thinking forward. Second, tonight my task is to make a calendar for the development of the Instructional Quality Assessment for Secondary Mathematics(IQAsm) that will hopefully be used in professional development projects around the nation…

read more »

ah…. I’m not sure if it is unethical or not to share what I did about what the math teachers wrote on their surveys. If I get it published, it’s fine, but blogging is not publishing. I guess I’ll just take out the juicy details of what the math teachers were confused about. Their answers…

read more »

Imagine the ocean swirling. Imagine the atmosphere-the winds, the hot and cold fronts, the storms. I’m sitting in a lecture explaining how to model fluids with differential equations. I’m no expert on differential equations, but I’ll try to explain. They are very useful for modeling anything in the world with changing quantities. For example, if…

read more »

In one of my classes I have to write a paper about how to improve mathematics instruction at a real school, with real people, and real time constraints. Help? I took this class precisely because I wanted to attempt to put my knowledge into practice and come up with a plan for a school, and…

read more »

My awesome office mate who helped me pass statistics last semester got engaged in the Pelham Math debates and wrote a Rubenstien-esque statistical analysis of the studies used to justify removing a particular curriculum from the schools. Here are his thoughts: So I have several issues about this article that was posted by the PMC.…

read more »

At the risk of writing another critical post about math education, and potentially coming off like I think I know it all(grad school just teaches you how much you don’t know), I’m going to complain about mathematicians who think they have expertise to pass judgement on elementary curriculum. They have a bit more understanding of…

read more »

Who is getting attention in math education right now? Khan Academy. Mathalicious. Dy/Dan. Flipped Classrooms. There are some reasons that each of these solutions to some of the issues math education faces are good things. 1. Khan-he has a BS in math from MIT so he understands math better than most high school teachers. 2.…

read more »

I went to a panel on Common Core Standards in DC this weekend led by Bill Schmidt at Michigan State University. He’s involved in Common Core assessment design and research on teacher’s implementation of Common Core. He was excited by the possibilities of collaboration around coherent standards but still the tone of the discussion he…

read more »

Sometimes I curse my graduate professors for enabling me to see the issues in math education so clearly. It makes me feel a great weight of responsibility. Of course, most math educators believe that they see the issues clearly and their ideas are the solutions to the problem so I may just be deluded. But…

read more »

About this Blog

Learning more about life than math…

Region
Las Vegas Valley
Grade
High School
Subject
Math

Subscribe to this blog (feed)


Archives